Frequently Asked Questions

Q: When did you start playing?

A: When I was 7 years old.

 

Q: Who is your biggest influence?

A: I have many influences in music but my first biggest influence on the bass was Jaco Pastorius.

 

Q: Who is your teacher?

A: Right now I don’t have a regular teacher but I've studied with Anthony Wellington for 3 years and attended Wooten Woods and Berklee Summer Groove School with Victor Wooten and the Berklee bass faculty. I also went to Gerald Veasley's Bass Bootcamp for several years. My Dad, who is a jazz trumpet player, taught me to improvise. Adam Nitti has also helped me develop my solo lines. 

 

Q: How much practice do you do a day?

A: It varies depending on school, but I practice at least an hour on school days and 2 to 3 hours a day on the weekends and holiday periods. 

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Q: What is your practice routine?

A: It varies but I always play basic diatonic chord and scale exercises first. I cover both pick and slap style either with a metronome or my Beat Buddy. I'm always learning new songs and bass lines and transcribing solos too. I spend time on reading whenever I can. I play my 5 string, 6 string and fretless basses very day to keep the familiarity,  

 

Q: What kind of strings do you use?

A: On my fretted basses I use Custom Nickel Wounds made by Carlos Pavicich. On my fretless they are GHS Black Nylon tape wounds.

 

Q: How do you get that tone on your Music Man Bongo 6?

A: They say “tone is in the fingers” My EQ amp settings are flat and I have the bass and mid boosted on the bass with the treble rolled off.

 

Q: What is your recording set up?

A: We record at home direct into a Mac using a Focusrite Solo and Logic Pro X. We use Final Cut For for editing videos.

 

Q: What exercises do you use for dexterity?

A: I play digital patterns and diatonic exercises a lot with a metronome.

 

Q: What advice do you give for beginning improvisors on the bass?

A: Listen and transcribe. You can’t learn to improvise out of a book. Play first and the theory comes later. Learn bass lines and solo fills by the great players. YouTube has a great function for slowing things down. .